People

The Centre for International Business and Economic Law is led by Centre Co-Directors Associate Prof Heng Wang and Associate Professor Xiao-chuan (Charlie) Weng

Centre Members

Professor Ross Buckley
Professor Deborah Healey

Associate Professor Heng Wang
Associate Professor Xiao-chuan Weng
Dr Jie (Jeanne) Huang
Dr Weihuan Zhou
Dr Nicholas Morris
Laurie Pearcey
Dr Junfang Xi (Emma)
Dr Cheng-Yun Tsang

 

CIBEL Fellows

Professor Colin Picker
Associate Professor Lisa Toohey
Professor Wenhua Shan
Shu Zhang

PhD Candidates 

Xue Bai (Sophia)
Huiqin Jiang
Simon Lacey
Chenxi Wang
Xiaomeng Qu

Dan Xie

Centre Administration and Contact

cibel@unsw.edu.au

 


Professor Ross Buckley

I joined the Faculty in 2007, and was appointed a Scientia Professor and to the CIFR King & Wood Mallesons Chair in International Finance Law in 2013.

My principal area of research interest is in regulatory measures to increase the resilience and stability of financial systems. I have written a substantial number of publications exploring how China might more effectively participate in international financial governance.  My present particular focus is on the regulation of digital financial services in a range of jurisdictions including China.

I have led four major three-year research projects funded by the ARC and received numerous other research grants. I co-edit two book series for Wolters Kluwer of The Hague on international banking and finance law and international trade law.

Law website profile:  http://www.law.unsw.edu.au/profile/ross-buckley


Professor Colin Picker

Prior to joining UNSW in 2010, Colin Picker was the Daniel L. Brenner/UMKC Scholar & Professor of Law at the University of Missouri - Kansas City School of Law.  He entered academia in 2000, after practicing in the International Group of the Washington, D.C., law firm of Wilmer, Cutler & Pickering. His practice included transnational & trade litigation, international transactions and international congressional policy work. Prior to practice in Washington, he clerked for the Honourable José A. Cabranes of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit.

He has published widely in the areas of International Trade/International Economic Law, International Law and in Comparative Law.  He has published in many journals, in America, Europe and Asia. Among other books, he is also a co-author of COMPARATIVE LEGAL TRADITIONS: TEXTS, MATERIALS AND CASES ON WESTERN LAW, 4th Edition (Thomson West) (2014) (with Mary Ann Glendon and Paolo Carozza).

He was one of the founders and was founding Executive Vice President (2008-2014) of the Society of International Economic Law, a global academic organization for international economic law.  He has also been active in the International Economic Law Group of the American Society of International Law (Co-Chair 2005-2007), and in the American Society of Comparative Law (a former member of the Executive Council and former Chair of the Young Comparatists Committee).

In furtherance of his work on comparative legal education, he has visited and taught at law schools around the world, including, among many others, in the United States, Russia, China, Israel, and Vietnam. Currently his primary research interests are the role of legal culture in international economic law (the subject of his thesis) and also comparative legal education.

Law website profile:  http://www.law.unsw.edu.au/profile/colin-picker

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Professor Wenhua Shan

Wen holds a PhD from Trinity College, Cambridge and in addition to being a Professor at UNSW Law is the Yangtze River Chair Professor of International Economic Law (by Ministry of Education) and the founding Dean of the School of Law at XJTU. He is also the founding Director of the XJTU Silk Road Institute for International and Comparative Law (SRIICL), the Convenor of the  Collaborative Innovation Centre for Silk Road Economic Belt Studies (CIC-SREBS, jointly established by MOFCOM, Shaanxi Provincial Government and XJTU) and a Senior Fellow of the Lauterpacht Centre for International Law at the University of Cambridge. 
 
Wen’s research area is international and comparative law, particularly investment and trade laws. He is the lead advisor to the Chinese government on some key investment treaty negotiations, and has advised foreign governments, international organizations, and transnational corporations on international investment, trade and arbitration matters.  He has authored over a dozen books published by English or Chinese publishers including Oxford University Press, and numerous articles in journals such as the European Journal of International Law and the American Journal of Comparative Law. He is also the founding Editor-in-Chief of The Chinese Journal of Comparative Law (OUP) and the Editor-in-General of the China and International Economic Law Series(Hart) and the Silk Road Studies in International Economic Law (BRILL), among others.  
Wen is a frequent lecturer and has spoken before the European Parliament (Testimony on the EU-China BIT), the International Congress of Comparative Law (General Report on the Protection of Foreign Investment), Energy Charter Ministerial Conference (ISDS Reform), among others.  He is  a Titular Member of the International Academy of Comparative Law, a Member of the American Law Institute and the WEF/ICTSD E15 Task Force on Investment Policy, and an international advisor for the Fourth Restatement of the U.S. Foreign Relations Law, the ICSID Review and the IBA Subcommittee on Investment Treaty Arbitration.
 
Deborah joined the Faculty of Law after practising extensively as a commercial lawyer with leading law firms. There her major focus was on on competition law, and she advised clients on all aspects of the Competition and Consumer Act, including consumer law from the perspectives of business and consumers. She regularly dealt with the regulator on mergers and potential breaches. She devised tailored compliance programs for her clients.  She has researched written and advised very widely in relation to sports law, advising  sports, sportspeople and their commercial partners on all aspects of their sport and commercial relationships. Deborah has had considerable experience as a sports tribunal chair and member, and has appeared before various tribunals including the Court of Arbitration for Sport. She has been a board member for significant state and national sporting organisations. 
 
She teaches courses in Competition Law at undergraduate and postgraduate levels, has developed a course in Asian Competition Law which she teaches with other regional experts, and also Australian Consumer Law. Deborah has developed and teaches in number of sports related commercial courses in the LLM programme.
 
Deborah's current research focus is on competition law and particularly the the developing competition laws of China, Singapore and Hong Kong. She taught  Comparative Competition Law at Tsinghua University in Beijing (2013). She  is regularly invited to address students at undergraduate and postgraduate levels at leading universities in  China and Hong Kong.  She  recently led and completed research projects for the United Nations Commmittee on Trade and Development (UNCTAD). The first was on Competitive Neutrality in Developing Countries, and the second (jointly led with Professor Eleanor Fox of NYU and continuing ) was entitled Competition Law and the State.
 
Deborah's  membership of the Commonwealth Consumer Affairs Advisory Committee has seen substantial input into reform of Australian Consumer Law. Her research on sport and law focuses particularly in areas of governance in sport, sponsorship and anti-doping. She is editor of the Australia and New Zealand Sport Law Journal. She is convenor of Corporate and Commercial studies in the LLM Programme and Chair of the Postgraduate Education Committee. She was appointed as the first woman board member of the New South Wales Rugby League in 2013.
 
She is admitted as a Solicitor of the Supreme Court of  New South Wales and the Federal Court of Australia.
 

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Associate Professor Lisa Toohey teaches and researches in the fields of dispute resolution and international trade law, and serves as director of dispute resolution programs within the Faculty. Prior to joining UNSW Law in 2010, Lisa was an academic at the University of Queensland,  and before academia practised as a commercial lawyer in Australia and Vietnam in the areas of litigation & dispute resolution, intellectual property, and trade and investment.
Lisa is a co-chair of ANZSIL’s  International Economic Law Interest Group, and in 2013 was an IEL Fellow of the Georgetown Institute of International Economic Law.   She has been appointed to Executive Council of the Society of International Economic Law and is a member of the Asian WTO Research Network.    She has been a consultant in Southeast Asia and Central Asia on dispute resolution and WTO projects funded by the Australian, US and Canadian governments, and has taught as a visiting professor at the Centre Franco-Vietnamien de Formation à la Gestion at the National Economics University in Hanoi, Vietnam, and at Naresuan University in Phitsanulok, Thailand.  Lisa is a designated international arbitrator of the Azerbaijan Arbitration and Mediation Centre.
 
Current research projects include trade capacity building in Australia and the Asian region; China’s engagement in international dispute settlement;  and on legal information experience in Australian dispute resolution.  She has a particular interest in supervising research students in  WTO Law, investment arbitration, and dispute resolution domestically and internationally.

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Heng joined UNSW in 2015. Previously, as a professor at Southwest University of Political Science and Law (SWUPL), China, he headed a WTO law center (established by the Department of Treaty and Law, the Ministry of Commerce and SWUPL) and has been the recipient of top research awards and several major grants, including the triennial China Outstanding Law Research Award, twice, (China Law Society) and the Outstanding Research Award in Humanities and Social Science (the Ministry of Education).
 

Heng has spoken at the WTO Headquarters and around 40 universities in America, Europe, and Asia, including Harvard University, Columbia University, New York University, University of Pennsylvania, University of Virginia, the LSE, University of Paris 1 and Waseda University. As a visiting professor, he taught at UNSW, University of Ottawa, Case Western Reserve University, Yokohama National University, and Xiamen University. Besides being a visiting professor at Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies and University of Cagliari, he conducted research at the WTO Secretariat, and was the Visiting Professorial Fellow of UNSW and the Max Weber Fellow at European University Institute.

Besides books, he published widely within and outside of China in journals including the Journal of World Trade and Cornell International Law Journal , and his research has been quoted by scholars such as those from Oxford University and the Max Planck Institute. Heng’s research interest focuses on China’s interaction with international economic law, particularly in the context of the WTO and free trade agreements, services trade and investment, trade linkage issues (e.g. trade, culture and technology), and Chinese law.

Heng was an Executive Council member of the Society of International Economic Law (2008-2015), and is a founding member of the Asian International Economic Law Network, a member of the Asian WTO Research Network, and an executive council member of all three Chinese societies of international economic law or WTO law.

Heng has advised or provided training to the government, international organization, and the private sector, and is an arbitrator of arbitration institutions in China and Europe. He is adjunct professor at SWUPL, China.

Law website profile:  http://www.law.unsw.edu.au/profile/heng-wang


Charlie Xiao-chuan WENG joined the UNSW Law faculty in 2015. Previously, he was Oriental Scholar Chair Professor of Law and Assistant Dean at the KoGuan Law School of Shanghai Jiao Tong University (SJTU) . He also taught at Nagoya University Graduate School of Law (Japan) as Designated Associate Professor. He studied law at East China University of Political Science and Law (ECUPL) before completing his LLM at the National University of Singapore (NUS). After working for ECUPL for five years, he went to the University of Pennsylvania School of Law for his LLM and SJD in corporate law, followed by an appointment as a Robert S. McNamara Fellow at the Yale Law School Center for the Study of Corporate Law. In 2012, he was recruited by SJTU as a Research Professor.

His research interest centers on law and business. He has published widely in the fields of corporate law, securities law, and bankruptcy. His research projects were heavily supported by multiple organizations, including the World Bank and the Municipal government of Shanghai. Before joining UNSW, he had received more than one million RMB research funding, with his research outputs providing assistance to funding organizations. Currently, he is especially interested in research on the law of capital markets, the fundamental theory of corporate law and is interested in employing cross-disciplinary research methodologies to analyze the impact on the real economy of changes in the law governing corporate law and financial regulation. 

Law website profile:  http://www.law.unsw.edu.au/profile/charlie-xiao-chuan-Weng

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Dr Jie (Jeanne) Huang

Jie teaches and researches in the fields of international investment law and dispute resolution (international litigation and arbitration). Recently, she works on how the development of e-commerce impacts upon international economic law (e.g. TPP) and private international law (e.g. personal jurisdiction). She also has expertise on underwater cultural heritage protection.

Jie joined the UNSW Law faculty in 2016 as Senior Lecturer. Previously, she was an Associate Professor and Associate Dean at Shanghai University of International Business and Economics School of Law in China. She was awarded Pujiang Rencai (Pujiang Scholar) in 2011 and Shuguang Xuezhe (Dawn Scholar) in 2013 by Shanghai Education Committee.

Jie obtained her Doctor of Juridical Science (S.J.D.) degree from Duke University School of Law in the US in 2010. She was a Foreign Research Fellow at the Max Planck Institute for Comparative and International Private Law, Hamburg, Germany, and also had research experience at the Hague Academy of International Law, the Hague, the Netherlands and the Academy of International Arbitration Law, Paris France.

Jie has published two monographs and will publish an English textbook on International Business Transactions in 2016. She has also authored more than thirty articles in law journals both in English and in Chinese, such as Journal of International Economic Law and Journal of Private International Law. Eight of her articles are indexed by SSCI. Her research was funded by China Ministry of Education, the China Law Society, Shanghai Government Development and Research Center Fund, and Shanghai Philosophy and Social Science Fund. In 2015, she won the First Prize of Excellent Scholarship awarded by the China Society of Private International Law and Nomination Award of the Dong Biwu Prize for Youth Research in Law.

Currently, she serves as Member on the International Law Association International Committee on Intellectual Property and Private International Law. She is a reviewer for China Economic Review (SSCI), Asia-Pacific Law Review (SSCI) and Maritime Policy & Management. She also serves as an Arbitrator at the Shanghai International Economic and Trade Arbitration Commission (Shanghai International Arbitration Center).

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Dr Weihuan Zhou

Dr Weihuan Zhou joined UNSW law school as a lecturer on 1 April 2015. Prior to joining UNSW Law, Weihuan was a trade and commercial lawyer at a top-tier Australian law firm in Sydney. In that capacity, he has advised the Government of China, Chinese industry associations, and numerous major producers and exporters from different countries in various trade remedy investigations in Australia. He has also acted for major Chinese state-owned enterprises and private companies in a number of cross-border transactions including major Chinese investment into energy and resources, agriculture and property in Australia. Before that, Weihuan has undertaken a consultant role at the World Trade Organisation Secretariat and conducted research at Sydney Law School. Currently, Weihuan continues to consult for leading Australian law firms on foreign trade and investment matters. He is a qualified lawyer in Australia.

Dr Zhou's research covers the laws of the World Trade Organisation, trade remedies, free trade agreement, general international economic law, cross-border transactions especially the two-way trade and investment between China and Australia, Chinese commercial law, China's trade and investment policies and regulations, and China's integration into the international economic order. He has published in a number of top journals on international economic law such as the  Journal of International Economic Law, the  Journal of World Trade, the  World Trade Review, and the  Manchester Journal of International Economic Law.

Dr Zhou's current research explores the non-discrimination principle of the WTO, China's implementation of WTO rulings, the China-Australia Free Trade Agreement, China's regulations of digital financial services, and China’s domestic reforms of trading rights

Law website profile:  http://www.law.unsw.edu.au/profile/weihuan-zhou

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Dr Nicholas Morris

Dr Nicholas Morris is an Adjunct Professor at UNSW Law and  has worked in China during the last twelve years. He is a Guest Professor at the China Executive Leadership Academy, Pudong, which provides in-career professional development for senior government officials. He has advised Chinese government agencies and companies on banking reform, capital market development and regulation, and overseas investment, as well as on energy and environmental policy. He is an economist with qualifications in engineering, corporate finance and law, and has over 35 years experience working in think tanks and research consultancies.

Nicholas was Deputy Director of respected UK think tank the Institute for Fiscal Studies and founder CEO of London Economics. He has held academic posts in Oxford, London and Melbourne. Recent consulting projects include helping to write Indonesia's latest five-year plan and energy strategy, and advisory on social housing in Malaysia. He was co-editor of Capital Failure: Rebuilding Trust in Financial Services, published in 2014, and is playing a leading role in ongoing research at Oxford on this topic.

Nicholas has a PhD in law from University of New South Wales, Sydney. He also has an MPhil in economics, and an MA in engineering science, both from Oxford, as well as a diploma in corporate finance from London Business School. He is currently Academic Visitor and Senior Research Associate at Balliol College, Oxford, and a Visiting Fellow at the Martin School, Oxford. 

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Laurie Pearcey 

Laurie Pearcey is the Pro-Vice Chancellor, International and is responsible for implementing UNSW's global impact strategy and supporting a small number of transformative global partnerships and alliances, such as the PLuS Alliance; achieving substantive strategic outcomes from UNSW’s key international networks (U21, APRU, GlobalTech) so that all aspects of the University’s international activity contributes measurable reputational, research and teaching outcomes; strengthening the University’s global profile and reputation in priority countries, through influential networks and proactive communications strategies; providing leadership of UNSW’s broader internationalisation activities within the University and as part of the Higher Education sector more widely; working with the DVC Enterprise and wider Enterprise Leadership Group to advance the University's knowledge exchange agenda overseas through major initiatives such as Torch 

Previously, he led UNSW Australia's international strategy with specific responsibility for Greater China and India. Laurie also holds a dual appointment as the Director of the Confucius Institute at UNSW Australia.

Prior to joining UNSW, Laurie was the Chief Executive Officer of the Australia China Business Council where he led the Council’s strategic engagement with the Chinese and Australian Governments and represented the collective interests of major industry stakeholders in the Sino-Australian trade and investment relationship.



Laurie was described by the China Daily as 'at the forefront of almost all business, personal and political relations between Australia and China' and is widely regarded as one of Australia's leading China experts.

He is a respected commentator on the Chinese political economy, Australia's relationship with China and higher education issues contributing regularly to major media organisations including the ABC, Channel NewsAsia, Fairfax, Xinhua News and the People's Daily. 



As ACBC CEO, Laurie was a strategic advisor to some of Australia and China’s largest and most influential corporations and worked closely with companies such as Rio Tinto, ANZ, ACCOR Hotels, Qantas Airways, QR National, British Gas, Huawei Technologies and Yancoal.

Laurie is a proud UNSW alumnus and a Scholar of the Order of Australia Association Foundation and was a Visiting Fellow in Pacific and Asian History at the Australian National University.

 Laurie is currently studying a Master of Business Administration in Higher Education Management at University College London.

Laurie is a fluent Mandarin speaker and has worked in broadcasting with China Central Television and previously worked for a subsidiary of one of China’s largest state-owned oil and gas corporations as well as a range of MPs in the state and federal parliaments. 

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Dr. Junfang Xi (Emma)

Dr. Junfang Xi (Emma) is the associate professor of International Economics and Trade at Antai College of Economics and Management, Shanghai Jiao Tong University (SJTU). Emma received her Ph.D. in Enterprise Management and her master and B.S. degree in International Trade from the Antai College, SJTU. Her research interests revolve around international trade rules, WTO rules, and international business. She is particularly interested in the antidumping practice and rules and regional economic integration. She was awarded the Excellent Teaching Achievement of Shanghai Municipal Government in 2005 and the Excellent Teacher of Shanghai Jiao Tong University in 2010.

Emma was the visiting scholar at Marshall School of Business, University of Southern California (USC) in 2009 and at Sauder Business School, University of British Columbia (UBC), Canada in 2001.

Emma was the co-director of University of Southern California-Shanghai Jiao Tong University Global EMBA (GEMBA) Program from 2006 to 2012, in charge of recruitment, teaching affairs administrations and coordinating with the leaders of two Universities, etc. Meanwhile, as the co-faculty of Theme 7 of GEMBA program, leading the students to conduct company live-case analysis in Japan, Korea, India and other South East Asia countries, such as Thailand and Vietnam.

Emma is now the Chinese Director of Confucius Institute at UNSW Australia.  

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Dr Cheng-Yun Tsang

Dr Cheng-Yun Tsang joined the Faculty of Law as a research fellow in September 2015 to work on the Regulation of Digital Financial Services project.

His research focus has been on the use of market discipline to enhance prudence, safety and soundness, and financial stability in the financial system, with particular emphases on the Greater China Area and on megabanks.  He also researches and writes on sovereign debt restructuring and other aspects of international banking and financial regulation.
 
Before joining UNSW Law, he obtained his SJD degree in May 2015 from Duke University School of Law. He has been a visiting scholar at Shanghai Jiao Tong University KoGuan School of Law, and a regulatory affairs intern at the Institute of International Finance (IIF) in the US.  Prior to joining the academy, he practiced banking and financial law in Taiwan as a transactional attorney and an in-house counsel for some years. 

Law website profile:  http://www.law.unsw.edu.au/profile/cheng-yun-tsang

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Shu Zhang

Shu Zhang is a Post-Doctoral Research Fellow of UNSW Law School and a member of CIBEL.

Shu obtained her PhD Degree from UNSW Law School in 2015 on the topic of “ the Public Policy Exception in the Judicial Review of International Commercial Arbitral Awards: Lessons from and for China”. Before that Shu graduated from Law School, Peking University, China, and was an exchange student of Law School, Duke University, the US.

Shu’s research interests focus on the law implementation and dispute resolution in trade, commerce and investment practices in Asia-Pacific Region and particularly, from China’s perspective. Shu conducted several research projects with Beijing Arbitration Commission and Australian Centre for International Commercial Arbitration.

Law website profile:  http://www.law.unsw.edu.au/profile/shu-zhang 

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Xue Bai (Sophia)

Xue Bai (Sophia) commenced her PhD at the Faculty of Law, University of New South Wales in August 2014. She got her LLB and LLM degrees in Law at Beijing Jiaotong University. Her supervisors are Professor Leon Trakman and Professor Mark Williams.

Her research topic is 'Reform of Chinese state-owned enterprises: What China can learn from the practice of competitive neutrality in Australia'. The aim of her research is to propose a variant of competitive neutrality policy that would suit China's needs and interests, rather than a comprehensive approach to implement CN policy in respect of state-owned enterprises.

Law website profile:  http://www.law.unsw.edu.au/profile/sophia-bai

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  Huiqin Jiang

PhD Candidate, LLB & LLM (China University of Political Science and Law, Beijing)

Brief Overview:

Huiqin Jiang is a PhD candidate of the Faculty of Law, University of New South Wales. Her supervisors are Professors Dimity Kingsford Smith and Colin Picker.

She got her LLB and LLM degrees in law from China University of Political Science and Law (Beijing). Prior to join UNSW in 2013, she worked as a legal consultant of a wholly foreign invested enterprise in Beijing and served first as a junior editor (part-time) and then an editor-in-chief (part-time) of Graduate Law Review.

Her interest focuses on foreign investment laws in both China and in Australia. Her current PhD research explores Australia’s foreign investment review system, from the perspective of its approach to Chinese State-Owned Enterprises’ (SOEs’) investments, in comparison to other countries’ government investments. Her research aims to identify whether Chinese SOEs’ investments are being treated differently, by way of case studies and interview fieldwork. Following those investigations and analyses, she hopes to then provide explanations for the current approaches as well as to suggest some recommendations that may improve the current systems. 

Law website profile: http://www.law.unsw.edu.au/profile/huiqin-jiang

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Simon Lacey

PhD Candidate

Simon is currently Senior Expert, Trade Facilitation and Market Access at Huawei Technologies in Shenzhen China. Before that he spent 4 years in Indonesia in various roles advising both the government and private sector on trade policy and international economic law issues.

With degrees in law from the University of Fribourg (Switzerland) and the Georgetown University Law Center (United States), Simon has worked in almost thirty countries, advising and training policymakers in Africa, Eastern Europe, the Middle East, Central Asia, East Asia and the Pacific.

At UNSW Simon is working on a PhD in law analyzing the different approaches taken in Indonesia and China to harness trade policy for development outcomes and to boost the competitiveness of different economic sectors.

Immediately prior to taking up the PhD which he works on concurrently to his role at Huawei, Simon was the Director of the Center for International Trade and Investment (UPH-CITI) at University Pelita Harapan (UPH) in Jakarta, where he was responsible for implementing the WTO Chairs program and acted as Academic Director on the UPH's executive Masters in Trade Investment and Competition Policy and Law (MTIC), organized in collaboration with the World Trade Institute (WTI) in Berne, Switzerland.

Simon began his career in international economic law at the WTI, where, between 2000 and 2006, he occupied various roles from research fellow to Director of Studies to Director of Training Programs. In 2006 Simon moved to Asia, first taking up residence as a visiting fellow at the Lee Kuan Yew School of Pubic Policy in Singapore before moving to Indonesia.

Simon’s substantive work to date has covered various areas of international economic law, including WTO accession, trade and agriculture, trade and services, trade and development, WTO dispute settlement and trade negotiations. He has published and lectured extensively on international trade law and policy and has served on several delegations to the WTO, including the Indonesian delegation to the 9 th WTO Ministerial Conference on Bali in December 2013.

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Chenxi Wang

PhD Candidate

Chenxi's research area is the WTO law and China. Her study focuses on the dynamics between China's local government and central government under the framework of WTO dispute settlement system. Chenxi's research is empirical which relies on documentary analysis and interdisciplinary which covers the subjects of law and political science.

Before joining UNSW, Chenxi worked in a governmental think tank in China as a legal consultant. During that period, Chenxi has participated in many international economic affairs-related consultation programs and published several academic articles.

Chenxi's broader research interest extends to the general international affairs. She hopes to contribute to the solution of international issues not only as a researcher but also as a practitioner. Chenxi finished her master's study in Japan and is fluent in Japanese. She is now studying French as her fourth language. 

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Xiaomeng Qu

PhD Candidate

Xiaomeng Qu joined the Faculty of Law, UNSW as a PhD candidate in August 2016. Her research focuses on property law and land law, with a focus on compulsory land acquisition and compensation issues in Australia, China, and the United States. 

Before joining UNSW, Xiaomeng studied public administration at East China University of Political Science and Law and got her LLM degree in Law at Shanghai University of Finance and Economics.  Xiaomeng hopes to provide both a solution for improving the relationship between the public and the state on land disputes in China and recommendations that align with China’s agenda for land reform. 

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Dan Xie (Dany)

PhD candidate

Dan Xie (Dany) holds LL.B and LL.M (Civil and Commercial Law) in China University of Political Science and Law (Beijing, China) and obtained her Master of Laws degree in International Commercial Arbitration Law from Stockholm University (Sweden) in June 2014. 

Prior to commencing her PhD in February 2016, Dany was an intern in Gernandt & Danielsson (Stockholm). She was accredited with the PRC National Legal Professional Qualification Credential in 2012 and previously practised as legal associate in the areas of trust law, contract law, company law, foreign investment law and investor-state arbitration at a top-tier law firm in Beijing.

Dany’s current research is in the areas of international commercial arbitration law, private international law, company law and contract law. Her  research explores the proper normative framework that guides enforcement courts when encountering ‘due process’ defence from the global perspective in theory and practice. Additionally, her research maps out the particular procedural issues arising from the ‘due process’ exception and proposes reasonable approaches to such specific procedural issues. 

 

 

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